Tuesday, June 16, 2009

when wikipedia meets the library: a case study from the university of san francisco

tomorrow evening i'm giving a talk at san francisco public library. i'll be discussing some assignments i use to get college students to create, share, and collaborate. it's free! you should go!

if things go as planned, i'll be discussing this:




and then this:





and finally this:









update: here's a photograph from my perspective. thank you sfpl!

8 comments:

Ivan Chew said...

I'd love to go. Do they do a webinar? Well, I hope you do a post-talk blog post. Or Tweet about it. Cheers.

Anonymous said...

the end of the book?

david silver said...

hello ivan!

i'm afraid what you see is what you get. =)

instead of writing up a paper or even writing up an outline, i used 15 photographs to tell the story of my students' work on wikipedia. i have a few notes in a notebook, but not much else remains.

it's an ongoing experiment for me - to frame a talk's outline around photos rather than words - and i think it allowed me to present my ideas more freely, less rigidly.

the drawback, though, is that the talk doesn't really translate to those not in attendance. like i said, it's an experiment! =)

anonymous - say more?

shernandez said...

got some throw back pic.s on here. the voting project was my favorite one. I would go if I was in the city.

david silver said...

sam - before i began talking about the wikipedia project/s, i talked a bit about the election exhibit, to showcase how students can collaborate in groups to make something meaningful - for themselves, for the class, and for campus. the audience was impressed with the work they saw so congrats to you and your peers.

Anonymous said...

Oh, an un-ironic allusion to:
http://elab.eserver.org/hfl0248.html

Chris Crowley said...

professor silver, i hope everything is well with you and your family, i am missing san francisco and await my refuge from the swamp, or as some people call it, "DC summers."

anyway my Mom sent me this article from The New York Times about wikipedia, and the difficulty to keep facts off of the internet, in this case especially considering the information being withheld was to better the chances of survival for this journalist who had been taken prisoner by the Taliban.

Maybe this will bedcome useful for classes in the future.

peace and love,

Chris Crowley

david silver said...

Hey Chris - good to hear from you and glad to hear you're surviving the swamps of DC!

thanks for mentioning the article. for those who want to read it, it can be found here. i'll definitely consider assigning this the next time i teach wikipedia. thanks Chris!